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World War One British poets Brooke, Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg, and others by Candace Ward

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Published by Dover Publications in Mineola, N.Y .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • English poetry -- 20th century.,
  • World War, 1914-1918 -- Poetry.,
  • Soldiers" writings, English.,
  • Soldiers -- Poetry.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesWorld War I British poets
Statementedited by Candace Ward.
GenrePoetry.
SeriesDover thrift editions
ContributionsWard, Candace.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR1195.W65 W67 1997
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 71 p. ;
Number of Pages71
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1010991M
ISBN 100486295680
LC Control Number96051566

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Ironically, the horrors of World War One produced a splendid flowering of British verse as young poets, many of them combatants, confronted their own morality, the death of dear friends, the loss of innocence, the failure of civilization, and the madness of war itself.4/5. It contains poems by 16 British poets. All poems are related to World War I, and many of these poets died in the war itself. They represent differing perspectives: pro-war, pro-Britain, anti-war, horror of war and so on. I came away from the volume having a strong sense of the divisions that World War I created in many participant nations. Ironically, the horrors of World War One produced a splendid flowering of British verse as young poets, many of them combatants, confronted their own morality, the death of dear friends, the loss of innocence, the failure of civilization, and the madness of war itself. This volume contains a rich selection of poems from that time by Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, Isaac 4/5(1).   World War One British Poets: Brooke, Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg and Others (Dover Thrift S.) Paperback – Unabridged, 22 Apr by Candace Ward (Editor) out of 5 stars 56 ratings See all formats and editions/5(60).

“There was no really good true war book during the entire four years of the war. The only true writing that came through during the war was in poetry. One reason for this is that poets are not arrested as quickly as prose writers” – Ernest Hemingway, in “Men at War”.   Among other prominent works reflecting the horrific realities of war was the four-part tome, Parade’s End, by English novelist Ford Madox Ford, and from the Eastern Front, Dr. Zhivago . Along with Sorley and Owen, Isaac Rosenberg () was considered by Robert Graves to be one of the three poets of importance whom we lost during the First World War. Like Owen and McCrae, Rosenberg died in before the Armistice, and his reputation as a great war poet was posthumous. Ironically, the horrors of World War One produced a splendid flowering of British verse as young poets, many of them combatants, confronted their own morality, the death of dear friends, the loss of innocence, the failure of civilization, and the madness of war itself. This volume contains a rich selection of poems from that time by Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, Isaac /5(2).

Buy World War One British Poets: Brooke, Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg and Others (Dover Thrift S.) by Ward, Candace (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: Pages in category "British World War I poets" The following 20 pages are in this category, out of 20 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (). Published poets wrote over two thousand poems about and during the war. However, only a small fraction still is known today, and several poets that were popular with contemporary readers are now obscure. An orthodox selection of poets and poems emerged during the s, which often remains the standard in modern collections and distorts the impression of World War I poetry.   Until I picked up this slim book of poems of British World War I poets, that is. After a few pages of some of the excellent poetry in this book, the pulse quickened, the lights came on, and poetry suddenly seemed War I () is pretty much a forgotten war today/5(5).