Neuroimaging of human memory
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Neuroimaging of human memory linking cognitive processes to neural systems by

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Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Memory,
  • Brain -- Localization of functions,
  • Cognitive neuroscience,
  • Electroencephalography,
  • Brain -- Magnetic resonance imaging,
  • Memory -- physiology,
  • Brain -- physiology,
  • Brain Mapping,
  • Cognition -- physiology,
  • Electroencephalography,
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging,
  • Geheugen

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Statementedited by Frank Rösler ... [et al.].
ContributionsRösler, Frank.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP406 .N484 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 474 p. :
Number of Pages474
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24045163M
ISBN 100199217297
ISBN 109780199217298
LC Control Number2009289602

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In looking at the close interaction between neuroimaging research and psychological theories of human memory, this book presents an exploration of imaging research on human memory, along with accounts of the significance of these findings with regard to fundamental psychological questions. The book describes theoretical and methodological developments in the use of functional neuroimaging techniques to study the neural basis of cognition, from early scientific efforts to link brain and behavior to the latest applications of fMRI and PET methods.4/5(6). In looking at the close interaction between neuroimaging research and psychological theories of human memory, this book presents a state-of-the-art exploration of imaging research on human memory, along with accounts of the significance of these findings . science, we still do not have a theory of human memory, we are still guided by phenom-ena, and we still test binary oppositions. The contemporary neuroimaging literature on human memory is saturated with studies that contrast encoding with retrieval, recollec-tion with familiarity, remembered with forgotten items, and correct with incorrect.

Introduction: Neuroimaging of human memory. Article (PDF Available) January The remaining four sections of the book cover specific areas of human memory research.   Neuroimaging data collection, performed at Tel Aviv University, was supported by the Austrian Science Fund (PG27), the Israel Science . Memory is not supported by a single brain region, but rather a wide set of brain areas. One brain region, however, is known to be especially important for memory and that is a structure deep in the brain's temporal lobes called the hippocampus. Human imaging studies 1. Episodic memory retrieval: An (event-related) functional neuroimaging perspective 3 M.D. Rugg and R.N.A. Henson 2. Fractionating episodic memory retrieval using event-related potentials 39 D.I. Donaldson, K. Allan and E.L. Wilding 3. Frontal contributions to episodic memory encoding in the young and elderly 59 R.L.

  We performed meta-analyses on 60 neuroimaging (PET and fMRI) studies of working memory (WM), considering three types of storage material (spatial, verbal, and object), three types of executive function (continuous updating of WM, memory for temporal order, and manipulation of information in WM), and interactions between material and executive by: Neuroimaging of Human Brain Function. This book covers the following topics: Brain Mapping Background, Brain Mechanisms in Vision, Brain Plasticity, Language, Memory, Future Imaging Developments. Author(s): National Academy of Sciences. Developed specifically for students in the behavioral and brain sciences, this is the only textbook that provides an accessible and practical overview of the range of human neuroimaging techniques. Methods covered include functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, electroencephalography Cited by: 1.   We review a program of research that uses neuroimaging techniques to determine the functional and neural architecture of human working memory. A first set of studies indicates that verbal working memory includes a storage component, which is implemented neurally by areas in the left-hemisphere posterior parietal cortex, and a subvocal rehearsal component, which is implemented by Cited by: